For Immediate Release
April 05, 2011
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Hatch Statement on House Budget Committee Chairman Ryan’s Budget Proposal

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), Ranking Member of the Senate Finance Committee, today said that while House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has laid out a plan to confront the nation’s broken entitlements and sky-rocketing national debt, the White House continues to “demonstrate a complete failure of leadership.”  The Finance Committee has jurisdiction over taxes, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.  Hatch issued the following statement:

“The status quo is unsustainable.  Our over $14 trillion debt is a threat to the future of our nation.  Spending has been out-of-control for far too long.  Our entitlement programs – Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security – look more like an empty promise that our children and grandchildren will pay for, but will never see. 

“In February, we saw the White House’s response: a budget that taxes, borrows, and spends too much - demonstrating a complete failure of leadership to confront our spending-fueled debt crisis.   In contrast, Paul Ryan has put serious ideas on the table to reform Medicare and Medicaid, streamline our tax code, cut spending, and confront our debt. He rightly includes a proposal to kick Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac off the government dole, fully repeal the budget-busting $2.6 trillion health law, and extend the 2001 and 2003 tax relief permanently, while reducing our corporate tax rate. 

“The White House and its Capitol Hill allies need to demonstrate real leadership and join Republicans in working to solve the tremendous fiscal challenges facing our nation. Unfortunately, what we are seeing from the other side is a defense of an unsustainable status quo and political attacks on Republican ideas.  That’s not the kind of leadership the American people are asking for.

“As Ranking Member of the Senate Finance Committee, we need to consider all ideas to fix our broken entitlements, cut spending and reform the overly-burdensome tax code.  We know that the Medicaid expansion in the $2.6 trillion health law threatens to bankrupt both states and the federal government.  We know that cutting over a half-trillion dollars from a nearly bankrupt Medicare system to create new entitlements and expand existing ones is the height of fiscal irresponsibility. We know that Social Security will not exist in the future if we fail to reform it now. We know our tax code is too complex, threatens our ability to compete in the world, and needs to be overhauled.” 

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